Forum: Research Questions

Discussing: But this is not that day

But this is not that day

Okay, this is where too much movie addles the brain. Did Peter Jackson pull Aragorn's 'But this is not that day' speech out of thin air, or does it exist in some form? I looked at the Helm's Deep chapter, thinking that Theoden might have said something similar, but no.

 

 

Re: But this is not that day

Hi Erunyauve,

I do not remember seeing that in any of Tolkien's works... but I would not be surprised if it was adapted from somewhere else.

Sorry I couldn't be more helpful...

- Barbara

 

 

Re: But this is not that day

>>Sorry I couldn't be more helpful...

Well, it's one of those things that is easier to disprove than prove. I would guess that it's a rather brilliant bit of fan fiction ('the speech Pippin missed because he was yammering on about Merry'), but as soon as we make that assumption, someone will turn up its antecedent in HOME.

 

 

Re: But this is not that day

Did Peter Jackson pull Aragorn's 'But this is not that day' speech out of thin air,

I think he 'adapted' it from Shakespeare - it sure sounds a lot like the St. Crispin's Day speech to me. Steal from the best, I always say.

Gwynnyd - who always segues into this at the end of Aragorn's speech


That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
Let him depart; his passport shall be made,
And crowns for convoy put into his purse;
We would not die in that man's company
That fears his fellowship to die with us.
This day is call'd the feast of Crispian.
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when this day is nam'd,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian.'
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispian's day.'
Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember, with advantages,
What feats he did that day. Then shall our names,
Familiar in his mouth as household words -
Harry the King, Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester-
Be in their flowing cups freshly rememb'red.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remembered-
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;
And gentlemen in England now-a-bed
Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.

 

 

Re: But this is not that day

>>I think he 'adapted' it from Shakespeare - it sure sounds a lot like the St. Crispin's Day speech to me.

That sounds likely enough. If so, I would imagine that there would be something somewhere in the credits, even though it's within the public domain. I'll have to look.

 

 

Re: But this is not that day

I would imagine that there would be something somewhere in the credits, even though it's within the public domain. I'll have to look.

Since none of the actual phrasing is repeated, I doubt it. But if you do find it inthe crdit, please do let us know!

 Gwynnyd

 

 

In Forums

Discussion Info

Intended for: General Audience

This forum is open to all HASA members. It is read-only for the general public.

Membership on HASA is free and it takes only a few minutes to join. If you would like to participate, please click here.

If you are already a member, please log in to participate.

« Back to Research Questions

Stories linked to the forum