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Is the Sindarin word meaning 'hunter' Fara or Faron, or something else? Also, how would one say "my little one" (I know that 'my' is 'nin'), as in a mother speaking of her son? RAKSHA

 

 

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'Faron' is the noun 'hunter' 'fara' would be the (3rd present) verb form - 'he/she/it hunts' for 'little one' you might use _pen dithen nín_ pen - is glossed 'one, somebody, anybody' tithen - 'little, tiny' (w/ t>d lenition) Ithildin *(

 

 

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Strangely enough, faron is also how you construct the phrase "I hunt" in the a-stem conjugation. It's also possible that faroth is "hunter," but it's more likely that's reserved for a group of hunters and faron is also the noun. Bado na sídh. Berz.

 

 

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Thanx much for the input, ladies! When does a word get lenited? Are there rules? Well, I'm sure there are rules, but are they comprehensible to those who don't understand the fine points of linguistics? Raksha

 

 

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How woulld you say "brave hunter"? I haven't been able to find a word for 'brave'.... RAKSHA

 

 

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OK, ‘brave hunter’ – well there’s no direct word for ‘brave’ but how about ‘bold’ or ‘dauntless’? ‘Faron’ and ‘feredir’ both mean ‘hunter’ (and I am unaware of any specific reason to pick one over the other.) ‘Cand’ & ‘beren’ both mean seem to mean ‘bold’. In this usage, both would be lenited as adjectives following the noun they modify. So in this case they would take the forms of ‘gand’ and ‘veren’. Note: ‘beren’ in this lenited form could be confused with ‘meren’ which means ‘happy, festive, joyous’ unless the meaning is clarified by context, as ‘m’ also lenits to ‘v’. Also, ‘thalion’ means ‘hero, dauntless man’ (lenition does not change ‘th’). So here are a few suggestions: Faron gand Feredir veren Faron thalion Re: lenition: The initial consonant of many words are lenited following such words as the (singular) definite article and prepositions; in adjectives following the nouns they modify; in direct objects and verbs following their subject, and often in the second element of compounds. There are several other types of mutations also, and there isn’t really any shortcut to avoid learning something of the language. Once you understand the way the mutations function, there are charts you can use to help you get the mutations right, so you don’t really have to memorize it all, but they won’t help much if you don’t understand what is happening to the word and why. Always open to discussion, Ithildin *(

 

 

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"OK, ‘brave hunter’ – well there’s no direct word for ‘brave’ but how about ‘bold’ or ‘dauntless’? ‘Faron’ and ‘feredir’ both mean ‘hunter’ (and I am unaware of any specific reason to pick one over the other.) ‘Cand’ & ‘beren’ both mean seem to mean ‘bold’. In this usage, both would be lenited as adjectives following the noun they modify. So in this case they would take the forms of ‘gand’ and ‘veren’. Note: ‘beren’ in this lenited form could be confused with ‘meren’ which means ‘happy, festive, joyous’ unless the meaning is clarified by context, as ‘m’ also lenits to ‘v’. Also, ‘thalion’ means ‘hero, dauntless man’ (lenition does not change ‘th’). So here are a few suggestions: Faron gand Feredir veren Faron thalion" So would 'my brave hunter' be 'faron thalion nin' in Sindarin? Also, what would the Sindarin words for 'Victor' and 'Defender' be? I'm naming two swords made at the same time by the same people. I know that 'tur' is 'victory', but haven't found 'victor'. Thanx for any help. Oh, I know that I've presented two Sindarin words without the circumflexes they're supposed to have, but I don't know how to do them in the computer. RAKSHA

 

 

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So would 'my brave hunter' be 'faron thalion nin' in Sindarin? That's how I'd do it. I seem to remember reading somewhere something about making a person's title out of nouns that are themselves gerunds, like victor or defender. But I was never taught it in my class and I can't find anything on it at the moment. If you've got anything on it, Ithildin, count me as curious, too. But, I'd get around it buy naming the two swords "victory blade" and "defending blade." Hathol túr for "blade of victory" and Beriol chathol for "protecting blade" or “blade that protects” since there's no word that I can find specifically listed for "defend." Keeping in mind that chathol is hathol with a soft mutation. The disadvantage of this scheme is that different word orders give you names that don't go with each other well; they don't follow the same kind of syntactical pattern. You might consider using "conquer" rather than "victory." That way you'd get "blade that conquers" or "conquering blade" which would come out to Orthorel chathol. But, of course, that's up to you. As for accents, if you're on a box running Windows, the numeric key pads should work for you. To get í hold down alt and type 0237. For ú it's alt + 0250. All the rest of the accents are in there, you just have to hunt for them. Or you can look up the character map in Start>Programs>Accessories>System Tools. Those codes should be listed there, too. Er... those are accent-agu, though (that's the term in French; don't know what it would be called in English... ^_^; ). To get circumflex, you'd want 0238 for the î and 0251 for û. It's a matter of taste which one you use, I guess, since they both seem to me to mean the same thing. I've never had anyone point out a difference to me, anyway. I guess I like the accent-agu because it looks more like what they do with the Sindarin letters, the Tíw. Bado na sídh. Berz.

 

 

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"But, I'd get around it buy naming the two swords "victory blade" and "defending blade." Hathol túr for "blade of victory" and Beriol chathol for "protecting blade" or “blade that protects” since there's no word that I can find specifically listed for "defend." Keeping in mind that chathol is hathol with a soft mutation. The disadvantage of this scheme is that different word orders give you names that don't go with each other well; they don't follow the same kind of syntactical pattern. You might consider using "conquer" rather than "victory." That way you'd get "blade that conquers" or "conquering blade" which would come out to Orthorel chathol. But, of course, that's up to you. As for accents, if you're on a box running Windows, the numeric key pads should work for you. To get í hold down alt and type 0237. For ú it's alt + 0250. All the rest of the accents are in there, you just have to hunt for them. Or you can look up the character map in Start>Programs>Accessories>System Tools. Those codes should be listed there, too. Er... those are accent-agu, though (that's the term in French; don't know what it would be called in English... ^_^; ). To get circumflex, you'd want 0238 for the î and 0251 for û. It's a matter of taste which one you use, I guess, since they both seem to me to mean the same thing. I've never had anyone point out a difference to me, anyway. I guess I like the accent-agu because it looks more like what they do with the Sindarin letters, the Tíw." Thanx, Berzerker! Blade of Victory sounds great, and Protecting Blade is fine, too. I need "Victory" rather than "Conquers. I'll try the alt-0238 and the other sequence offline. RAKSHA

 

 

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